Suppression Orders or Why transparency matters (8 min read)

Suppression orders very rarely protect victims. In a post #metoo world, after that awful Royal Commission, we need to be looking at this system of enforced secrecy which forces victims to carry the crimes in their heads forever. We need to question how keeping the secrets of guilty people has contributed to Australia’s sickening history of institutional abuse.

Read More Suppression Orders or Why transparency matters (8 min read)

Turning ‘trauma’ into ‘armour’: part 1 – the fungus

Content warning: this post discusses suicide and Electro Convulsive Therapy. Structure warning: I am writing with my editing and self-censorship blinkers off – paragraphs, sentences and arguments may be imprecise.  Context I started this post just after I was released from a five week psychiatric admission that included 12 sessions of Electro Convulsive Therapy. It […]

Read More Turning ‘trauma’ into ‘armour’: part 1 – the fungus

Grist for the mill

  Fresh off the rebound from another visit to the palace of justice. Reeling. Thinking. Grinding. Judgement will be given at the next date. Which is December. We will know if the Trump bomb is going to explode by then. I’ll be forty by then. Facebook memories showed me the crime scene this morning, wondered […]

Read More Grist for the mill

Self as subject: the peculiar pickle of autobiographical higher degree research

Paper presented at the University of Newcastle Creative Arts Research Symposium, Newcastle, Australia, 9 June, 2016. I do not condone the use of memoir, surveillance, or any other discourse altering substances. Writing a memoir involves taking one’s life and smearing it onto the page. When you craft a memoir, it is inevitably a personal experience […]

Read More Self as subject: the peculiar pickle of autobiographical higher degree research

‘Can we chat?’: A discursive consideration of conversations between casual and permanent academics

‘Can we chat?’ ‘Yeah, sure, anytime’ is what the casual academic is meant to say when facing this question from a permanent academic: particularly one who has employed them in the past. ‘Yeah, sure’ is probably the safest answer for a casual to give to almost any request from The Faculty. You know, if they […]

Read More ‘Can we chat?’: A discursive consideration of conversations between casual and permanent academics